Skip to content

Source Matters

Thinking about Origin

Category Archives: paper

The leather for this series was farmed in the U.S., processed in Mexico, and sent back to the U.S. without tariff under NAFTA and is sold to the American market of hobbyists and craftspeople as a do-it-yourself kit. I use both new technology and folk practice to mark the material and create my own version of the border souvenir based on the realities of border culture as it is mediated through news agencies and government reports.

Ciudad Juarez

Souvenirs from the Border:  Ciudad Juarez, 2009

Laser engraved and hand tooled vegetable tanned leather, leather lace, brass

8.25″ x 5.25″ x 3.25″

This tourist souvenir object considers the plight of young women drawn to the maquiladoras (border factories) in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

Olvera St, Los Angeles 6/2009

Souvenirs from the Border: Ciudad Juarez, 2009

Installation view. Olvera Street, Los Angeles, CA. June, 2009.

Tijuana

Souvenirs from the Border: Tijuana, 2009

Laser engraved and hand tooled vegetable tanned leather, leather lace, brass

6.25″ x 4.25″ x 2.75″

This tourist souvenir object considers the plight of young women drawn to the maquiladoras (border factories) in Tijuana, Mexico.

Olvera St, Los Angeles, 6/2009

Souvenirs from the Border: Tijuana, 2009

Installation view. Olvera Street, Los Angeles, CA. June, 2009.

La Etiqueta, Mondero, Cartera

Recuerdos: La Etiqueta, Mondero, Cartera, 2009

Olvera St, Los Angeles, 6/2009

Mondero Detail

Los Cinturónes, 2009

Los Cinturónes, 2009

Los Cinturónes Olvera St, Los Angeles, 6/2009

La Cartera - Olvera St, Los Angeles, 6/2009

La Cartera, 2009

Tacos Asada y Adobada

Tacos Asada y Adobada Koozie, 2009

All objects are laser engraved and hand tooled vegetable tanned leather, some with leather lace, waxed cord, steel, acetate, plastic, foam, etc

From the series “Souvenirs from the Border”, these tourist objects depict the realities of life in the border cities as reported by the associated press. Military presence, poverty, and cartel crimes are recurrent themes. I use both technology and folk practice to create my own border souvenir.

Cartel Picado / Paper Flags

These paper flags are drawn from the Mexican tradition of papel picado (cut paper). Traditionally used for celebrations of all forms (fiesta, holy days, weddings, etc.), these flags bear the portraits of cartel bosses of the border region. They are hung in order to reflect control of the border regions using quantity to show more or less power, and order to create an abstracted map of the region.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , ,